The first rule of photographing the unforgettable Mormon Row Barns is to show up very early before sunrise. Located on Antelope Flats Road only a few minutes off Highway 26 in Grand Teton National Park, the barns have often been called the most photographed barns in the U.S. There’s nothing as majestic as seeing the sunrise wash over the Thomas A. Moulton Barn. The front of the barn turns from dark brown to a deep yellow-orange as the warm sun hits the old wood planks. Depending on the time of year and weather, you may be lucky enough to have a full stream of water in front of the barn. If you are spending numerous days in the area, come back often as the scene changes with different cloud formations, light and possibly even bison roaming in the front of the barn.

photo of mormon row barns at sunrise

Thomas A. Moulton Barn in Grand Teton National Park © John Wulfert Photography

photo of mormon row barns

T.A. Moulton Barn from the Trees © John Wulfert Photography

There are numerous angles to experiment with, but the crowds can be thick if the weather is decent. If you arrive early, bring a headlamp to make finding your way and setting up a little easier. There are 2 main barns to focus your efforts. The Thomas A. Moulton barn is on an unpaved road south of Antelope Flats Road. The John Moulton Barn is located slightly north, easily within walking distance if you don’t feel like moving your car. Be careful in this area, as the bison and other wildlife roam free and will often be within feet from where you are standing and/or driving.

Many people wonder if they can wander beyond the fence and think it may be private property. This is park land, and you can absolutely walk past the fence for a better shot and to try different compositions. Be courteous to other photographers if there’s a photog crowd all trying for the same image. It’s frustrating when another photographer walks right into someone’s frame, causing someone to lose a desired shot. Most photographers are very friendly and willing to wait a few minutes if you ask them before walking in front of their frame.

Thomas Moulton took over 30 years to build this barn, so spend some time taking in the history once you have your photos.

sunrise picture of mormon row barns

Thomas A. Moulton Barn in Grand Teton National Park © John Wulfert Photography

photo of mormon row barns

John Moulton Barn in Grand Teton National Park © John Wulfert Photography

The John Moulton barn, located north of the Thomas Moulton Barn, offers numerous compositions. I suggest you use a long lens and setup at a distance in the brush to the East of the barn. Zoom into the barn to compress the mountains in the background. You won’t be disappointed. It can be muddy in the brush, so be careful and make sure you have your footing. And it should go without saying, but beware of wildlife. You could easily stumble across wolves, elk, moose, bears, bison and any of the other wildlife that is commonly found in Grant Teton National Park.

photo of mormon row barns

John Moulton Barn from the Brush © John Wulfert Photography